Sport Component

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PHD in business administration, concentration in tourism and Sport

Sport component

Faculty

Currently accepting doctoral students.

If you feel that your interests are a match to what we are doing, please do not hesitate to contact us to discuss a possible future as part of our research team.

R. Aubrey Kent Dr. Aubrey Kent
School of Tourism and Hospitality Management
1810 N. 13th Street, Speakman Hall 349
Temple University, Philadelphia, PA 19122
215.204.3810
aubkent@temple.edu

Research Interests

Dr. Kent currently is recruiting students who have interests in three broad areas:

  1. Corporate Social Responsibility. CSR is emerging as a critical and fertile area of organizational research. The sport industry has the ability to leverage its unique assets to promote social good, as has been active in doing so. Research potential is vast, as thus far has focused on various stakeholder benefits, financial outcomes, and in a limited fashion on social impact. New perspectives in this area are certainly welcome and encouraged.
  2. Work Attitudes. Employee attitudes have remained an important area of study through all manner of economic times. Currently, the competition for jobs and the cost of turnover have refocused efforts towards creating value through human resources. Social Identity theoretical perspectives have great potential for advancing the discourse regarding employees and volunteers in the sport industry, in particular.
  3. Leadership. Never out of style, the focus on leadership has sharpened decidedly over the past decade. Theoretical and practical perspectives that focus on succession issues and charisma are particularly of interest.

 

Jeremy S. JordanDr.Jeremy Jordan
School of Tourism and Hospitality Management
1810 N. 13th Street, Speakman Hall 366
Temple University, Philadelphia, PA 19122
215.204.3811
jsjordan@temple.edu

Research Interests

Dr. Jordan currently is recruiting students who have interests in one or more of these areas:

  1. Organizational Behavior. The effective functioning of organizations is dependent, in part, on the performance of employees. The attitudes that employees develop about their work experience can have a profound impact on various work behaviors. Understanding how and why employees develop specific work attitudes such as satisfaction, commitment, justice, as well as other attitudes can greatly benefit organizations desiring to become more effective and efficient.
  2. Participant Sport Events. The number of participant sport events, both large and small, continues to increase each year. There is a need to conduct research on various aspects/outcomes of these events to more completely understand how they benefit host communities. The Sport Tourism Research Network (STERN) is a group of academic and industry professionals who conduct research on participant sport events in order to provide evidence based recommendations on three related areas.
    • Community Benefit Analysis – measure of the economic benefits associated with event and the role the event has in promoting active leisure among community members.
    • Operation Analysis – determine participant satisfaction with event operations and provide managerial recommendations for improvement.
    • Marketing Analysis – provide demographic, psychographic, and behavioral profiles of participants.

 

Daniel Funk Daniel Funk
School of Tourism and Hospitality Management
1810 N. 13th Street, Speakman Hall
Temple University, Philadelphia, PA 19122
215.204.1972
dfunk@temple.edu

Research Interests

Professor Funk is currently recruiting students:
                   
The focus of Dr. Funk’s research is to understand internal and external factors that explain consumer involvement.  This research utilizes the Psychological Continuum Model as a conceptual and analytical framework to identify processes and stages that shape the development of attitudes and behaviors within a variety of contexts including sport, tourism, recreation, leisure and events.  The application of this research is to disseminate information on a broad range of social, psychological and environmental correlates of behavior.

Professor Funk has supervised a number of PhD students.  Selected topics include:

Current projects for student involvement:

 

Dr. Joris DrayerDr. Joris Drayer
School of Tourism and Hospitality Management
1810 N. 13th Street, Speakman Hall
Temple University, Philadelphia, PA 19122
215.204.1943
jdrayer@temple.edu

Research Interests

Dr. Drayer currently is recruiting students who have interests in three broad areas:

  1. Sport Pricing. Although it is considered one of the traditional P’s of the marketing mix, research in sport pricing is limited. Further, with the introduction of new pricing strategies and an emerging secondary market for tickets, the potential for exciting and innovative research is vast. New perspectives in this area are certainly welcome and encouraged.
  2. Sport Pricing and Consumer Response. With new pricing strategies emerging in sport, it is critical to understand consumer response as perceptions of fairness, quality, and value may be affected by price alone.  There is potential within this area to conduct survey-based as well as experimental research.
  3. Fantasy Sports and other Electronic Media.  New forms of electronic media are changing the way fans consume sport.  Understanding this change is critical for sport marketers as they continue to explore ways to use technology to enhance the sport experience.

 

Jeremy S. JordanJoe Mahan
School of Tourism and Hospitality Management
1810 N. 13th Street, Speakman Hall 365
Temple University, Philadelphia, PA 19122
215.204.3017
jmahan@temple.edu

Research Interests

Dr. Mahan is currently recruiting students with research interests in the following areas:

  1. Digital Media – The incorporation of digital media platforms into sport marketing strategy is becoming more and more popular.  Despite the proliferation of such platforms (e.g., Twitter and You Tube), however, little is known as to how and why (or why not) consumers respond to such tactics.  Therefore, further investigation into the use of new media by sport marketers could have utility in design and implementation of marketing strategy in the 21st Century.
  2. Marketing Communications – Consumers are flooded with thousands of marketing messages every day.  These messages appear in various forms (e.g., advertisements and sales promotions) and are delivered via a multitude of channels, including traditional (e.g., print) and ‘newer’ media (e.g., digital).  Exploring the psychology behind consumer processing of, and response to, said messages could: 1) contribute to the conceptual understanding of consumer decision-making; and, 2) aid in development, targeting, and implementation of marketing communications.
  3. Spectator Sport Consumption –Given that the mass mediation of spectator sport is a multi-billion dollar industry, gaining insight into how and why consumers watch sport is important.  Approaches include investigation into promotion of the mediated sport product and exploration of internal and external factors related to mediated sport consumption.

 

Joel MaxcyJoel Maxcy
School of Tourism and Hospitality Management
1810 N. 13th Street, Speakman Hall 366
Temple University, Philadelphia, PA 19122
215.204.8205
jmax@temple.edu

Research Interests

  1. Applications of the Economics of Sports
  2. Labor market analysis of Sport Industry
  3. Public finance of Sport Industry
  4. Industrial Organization of the Sport Industry
  5. International sports comparisons