Accreditation

STHM Accreditation Statement:

Temple University’s Sport & Recreation Management (SRM) and Tourism & Hospitality Management (THM) Programs are accredited by the Council on Accreditation of Parks, Recreation, Tourism and Related Professions (COAPRT). Temple STHM Sport & Recreation Management Program was first accredited in 1978, and the academic program(s) were reaccredited every 5 years since 1978. This means that Temple University was one of the first university programs to become accredited through the National Recreation and Parks Association (NRPA). The Council on Accreditation of Parks, Recreation, Tourism and Related Professions (COAPRT) accredits baccalaureate programs in parks, recreation, tourism, sport management, event management, therapeutic recreation, and leisure studies offered at regionally accredited institutions within the United States and its territories, and at nationally accredited institutions in Canada, and Mexico.

The following data exemplifies how Temple University’s STHM program meets the learning outcomes relevant to COAPRT Standards:

Standard 7.01

Students graduating from STHM’s SRM & THM programs will be able to apply a core body of discipline-specific knowledge to management situations.

Assessment

This learning outcome is assessed across the curriculum using various assessment strategies. For example, exam items, written papers, design projects, etc. For example, for Fall and Spring 2016 SRM students enrolled in the junior level Marketing course were require to develop a strategic marketing plan (STHM 3296) and students enrolled in THM Hospitality Design Capstone were responsible for developing destination design projects (THM 4397).

Results

During the 2016 academic year, results suggest that STHM students are exceeding expected level of achievement. An average of 100 % SRM students and 96 % of THM students scored 70% or higher on criterion for this outcome.

Standard 7.02

Students graduating from STHM will be able to identify and evaluate the impact of decisions regarding diversity & inclusion have on an organization, its employees, its consumers and the community at large.

Assessment

This learning outcome is being assessed across the curriculum using various assessment strategies. For example, exam items, written papers, etc. For example, for Fall and Spring 2016 students were engaged in assisting with and reporting on the inclusive strategies used in Recreation & Sport organizations through a Diversity Experiential assignment. Diversity Experiential Exercise (STHM 2114).

Results

During the 2016 academic year, results suggest that STHM students are exceeding expected level of achievement. An average of 95% of SRM and THM students scored 70% or higher on criterion for this outcome.

Standard 7.03

Students graduating from STHM’s SRM & THM programs will be able to analyze & interpret industry-related problems and their causes, generate alternative solutions and arrive at reasoned conclusions.

Assessment

This learning outcome is assessed across the curriculum using various assessment strategies, i.e. exam items, written papers, etc. For example, for Fall and Spring 2016 students in SRM were responsible for creating an executive summary based on a marketing plan (SRM 3296) and writing a Journal Review based on a current management or ethics-related problem in their industry (SRM 4296). Our THM students were responsible for strategic marketing plan (THM 3396), written assignment (THM 4396).

Results

During the 2016 academic year, results suggest that SRM students are exceeding expected level of achievement. An average of 100% of SRM students and 95 % of THM students scored 70% or higher on criterion for this outcome.

Important Information Regarding Degree Mills

Please watch this important video (http://youtu.be/a1voHNMQDrk) regarding degree and accreditation mills. According to CHEA, “Degree mills and accreditation mills mislead and harm. In the United States, degrees and certificates from mills may not be acknowledged by other institutions when students seek to transfer or go to graduate school. Employers may not acknowledge degrees and certificates from degree mills when providing tuition assistance for continuing education. “Accreditation” from an accreditation mill can mislead students and the public about the quality of an institution. In the presence of degree mills and accreditation mills, students may spend a good deal of money and receive neither an education nor a useable credential.” Read more on CHEA’s website (http://www.chea.org/degreemills/).